Tuna and Sweet Corn Blender Pie

Any of you who follow my blog will know that I love simple recipes. Not because I don’t like the challenge of a complex recipe, but because I do a lot of my cooking and baking during the week and I don’t often have a lot of time to labor over complex recipes. When I cook or bake, I like to make something that I can easily repeat during the week. Most complicated and laborious recipes I will leave for the weekend and even if they are exquisite I will usually make them once and then forget to make them again.

One of my go-to recipes during the week is a blender pie that is really quick and easy to put together and uses any kind of filling you have available in the house. The batter takes about 5 minutes to make and the filling often doesn’t take longer than 10 to 15 minutes.

Brazilians love blender pies and they come with all different fillings from chicken to tuna to vegetable medleys. Whatever can make for a tasty pie is bound to, one day, end up in a blender pie.

Usually I make an escarole and sausage blender pie (find the recipe HERE). But, we have stopped growing escarole on the farm, so I needed to find a new filling. I came across this recipe for a tuna and sweet corn pie sometime ago and absolutely loved it. I prefer this batter to my previous blender pie recipe and the filling is so tasty that this pie is a meal on its own!

TUNA AND SWEETCORN BLENDER PIE

For the Filling:
1 onion, finely chopped
1 carrot, chopped into small pieces or grated
1-2 tomatoes, diced
1 can of sweet corn
1-2 cans of tunafish

For the batter:
3 eggs
1 1/2 cups of white flour
1 cup of milk
1/2 cup of vegetable oil
Salt and pepper to taste
1 tbsp of baking powder

The Filling: In a large frying pan add a little bit of olive oil and heat. Add the onion and sautee for 5 minutes. Add the carrots and continue sauteeing until just tender, about 10 minutes. Add the tomato, sweet corn and tuna fish. Leave on the heat, stirring regularly, for another 5 minutes. Set aside to cool.

The Batter: Mix all of the ingredients together in a blender or a bowl.

Preheat the oven to 355F/180C. In a rectangular glass dish add a thin layer of the batter. Add the filling. Cover the filling with the remaining batter. Bake in the oven for approximately 45 minutes or until cooked through and lightly brown on top.

Serve with rice, beans and collards.

Advertisements

Feijoada – Brazilian Black Bean and Meat Stew

Brazilian FeijoadaThe other week, I was scrolling through all of the posts that I have done on my blog and was surprised to see that I hadn’t done a post on feijoada. I’m still a little bit in shock that I haven’t posted it here yet, but, let’s get over that shock and dig into this absolutely amazing dish!

Feijoada or black bean stew is the national dish of Brazil and is a must-have for when you visit Brazil. It is prepared with black beans and an assortment of meats, such as salted pork, beef and any kind of pork trimmings, ears, tail and feet. Bacon, pork ribs, sausage and jerked beef are commonly included as well. The fejoada is prepared over a low heat in a thick clay pot. The beans and meat are pre-cooked, some of the meats, like the bacon and sausage may be quickly fried in the pan before adding the beans. The smells are mouth-watering and the final dish should have a healthy amount of meat with a light covering of a dark purplish-brown broth from the beans.

It took me sometime to get accustomed to this dish, but that was in large part because beans were not quite my favorite thing to eat. But, it is difficult to not like this dish and after some time I fell in love with feijoada and can’t get enough of it.

It is difficult to go wrong with feijoada. It can be made with any variety of meats, traditionally pork and beef, and you can use as many cuts of meat as you want or as little. My recommendation is to always try to have some sausage, bacon and either pork ribs or pork loin. Just those meats alone can make an absolutely delicious Saturday lunch with friends and family.

Brazilian FeijoadaFeijoada is commonly eaten with rice, collards, farofa and slices of orange to cut the heaviness of the beans and meat!

Today I will leave you with a simple feijoada recipe (you can leave out any of the meats you do not eat or do not have, and although I have put quantities, these are just indications), and for the accompaniments you can click the links below.

> Brazilian White Rice Recipe
> Sauteed Collards Recipe
> Simple Farofa Recipe or Farofa with boiled egg

COMPLETE FEIJOADA

Ingredients

1 kg black beans
100 g jerked beef
50g bacon or pork belly
70 g pigs ear or 1 pigs ear
70 g pigs tail or 1 pigs tail
70 g pigs foot or 1 pigs foot
100 g pork ribs
100 g pork loin
250 g sausage

Seasonings

2 large onions, finely chopped
1 bunch of spring onions, finely chopped
3 bay leaves
6 garlic cloves, crushed
Black pepper
Salt

36 to 24 hours before making the feijoada, put the jerked beef and any salted meats in water to remove all the salt. Every few hours change the water.

If you do not have a pressure cooker, put the black beans to soak the night before.

On the day. Cut all of the meats into rough pieces, they can be a little bit bigger than bite size, but make sure they are not too big. Pre-cook the pork loin and ribs in water. I use a pressure cooker for this!

If using a pressure cooker, put the black beans with water to cook and leave cook on pressure for 30 minutes. If not using a pressure cooker, put beans in a pan with water and cook for approximately 60 to 90 minutes or until al dente.

Using a large deep pan or a clay pot, put a little bit of oil in the pan and heat. Add the onions and sautee for a few minutes, add the garlic and sautee until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the bacon or pork belly and sautee until almost cooked. Add the sausage, jerked beef, ear, tail and foot. Sautee for approximately 5 to 10 minutes. Add the remaining meat ingredients. Add the beans, bay leaf, salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer and leave on low heat for 20 to 30 minutes or until all of the meat is well cooked. If needed, you can add some water! Lastly, add the spring onions.

Serve warm with rice, collards, farofa and slices of orange.
Brazilian Feijoada

 

Information used from:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feijoada

Farofa with Boiled Egg

FarofaI get a lot of people who are looking for farofa recipes and I get a good number of questions about farofa, so I thought it was time to post a new farofa recipe. For those of you who don’t remember what farofa is or want to see my first post about it take a look HERE.

I absolutely love farofa and eat it with almost anything. My favorite is to eat it with rice, beans and meat. Traditionally it is served at barbecues with sausage, but you often find it as an accompaniment for any variety of dishes!

Farofa is super easy to make and can be made with any ingredients. Generally I stick to a simple recipe, but on the weekends or more special occasions I elaborate:). Here is one of my elaborated farofa recipes!

Ingredients

3/4 cup farinha de mandioca
2 – 4 tbsp butter
3 – 4 cloves of garlic, crushed
2 slices of bacon, finely chopped
1 boiled egg, chopped finely
1 handful of parsley

Melt the butter in a frying pan over medium heat. Add the crushed garlic and sauté for 1 minute. Add the bacon and fry for 3 – 4 minutes. Add the parsley together with the farinha de mandioca. Keep over the heat for approximately 1 minute. Lastly, add the boiled egg. Remove from the heat and place into a serving bowl. This can be served warm, cold, or room temperature.
Farofa

 

Bife a Rolê

Beef RollI don’t usually cook meat! In my house it is usually my husband who is in charge of cooking the meat and I do the rest of the cooking. Ok, so I do cook some meat, but it is mainly chicken. My husband credits himself with teaching me how to cook meat and getting over my squeamishness with even touching it. When I met my husband in 2005 I didn’t eat much meat and what I did eat generally consisted of chicken, turkey, and some more chicken. After living in Brazil for half a year in 2005 and 2006 I had been converted into a full meat eater. Yes, my husband did have a large role to play in this as he is a die-hard meat eater and needs it almost on a daily basis (me, not so much)!

Beef RollWhen I started on this journey to learn how to cook Brazilian food I knew that meat would pop-up at some point and I would have to buckle up and make an effort to really cook those red meats right. In such a meat-loving country as Brazil there is no way to avoid cooking meat. So, when I discovered this delicious dish I figured that this would be the perfect way to start my new meat cooking experiences. There isn’t too much seaoning, frying, grilling…etc that goes into cooking Bife a Rolê, so not too many areas to get it wrong. 

This is such a tasty and simple dish to make that after making it once I think I am now going to include it into my regular weekly cooking. If you have a pressure cooker at home this dish is quick and no hassle. This is a wonderful to eat with rice, beans, and collards. Of course, if you do not have a pressure cooker you can just follow the same cooking directions, it will just take longer!

For some beautiful pictures of how to assemble the Bife a Rolê take a look at the beautiful blog A Clove of Garlic, A Pinch of Salt. Tiffany adds a few more ingredients to her Bife a Rolê and there is nothing stopping you from adding whatever you think might go great in this dish.

Happy rolling!

Beef RollIngredients

1/2 kg (1 lb) patinho or (in the USA) silverside beef
1/2 onion, sliced
1 carrot, thinly sliced
4 strips of bacon
16oz can whole tomatoes
3 cans of water (same as the tomato)
oregano
salt

Flatten the meat and cut into long strips of approximately 2 – 3 inches wide. Roll each strip with carrots, bacon, and onion inside (or any other fillings of your choice). Hold the rolls together with one or two toothpicks. Put tomato, water, oregano, and salt in the pressure cooker. Place the beef rolls in the tomato mix making sure that they are fully covered by the liquid, if not, add more water. Cook for 30 minutes. Open the pressure cooker and cook open for approximately 10 to 15 more minutes depending on how much liquid is in the pan and how much liquid you want to serve with the bife a rolê. Serve hot with rice, beans, and sautéed greens.

For a PDF of this recipe CLICK HERE!

Farofa

Receita de FarofaIf you travel to Brazil and you eat meat, the chances of being offered farofa are pretty high. But, as a part of the offer to try this dish will be a very kind ‘but I am not sure if you are going to like it.’ There is something about Brazilians when it comes to foreigners and farofa that they do not think these gringos (term used to refer to foreigners in Brazil) will like this manioc flour based side dish. When my husband first offered farofa to me he started with the very kind phrase ‘but I don’t think you are going to like it.’ Well, he was wrong with that one! And it seems that Brazilians are still surprised when they learn that this gringa LOVES to eat and make farofa.

Ok, so you are probably reading this and wondering ‘what the hell is this farofa dish.’ Farofa is a side dish commonly served with meat, rice, and beans and is almost always found at churrascos (barbecues). Farofa is made from farinha de mandioca which is a much courser and less starchy manioc flour than regular tapioca flour (see my post about the different types of manioc flours in Brazil). The farinha de mandioca is slightly yellow and can be found in many different varieties, from toasted to course to flakey (looks a little bit like corn flakes)! The type of farinha de manioca you use depends entirely on your taste buds; there is no right or wrong farinha de mandioca to use when making farofa.

So the base of farofa is a dry and course manioc flour. Because this flour is rather tasteless and not nice to eat on its own, Brazilians use butter, onions, bacon, parsley, eggs and almost anything else you can imagine to flavor this flour and make it in to a deliciously yummy side dish that is paired beautifully with meat.

The secret to a really tasty farofa is the butter. Lots of butter is melted in a frying pan, onions are added and are either lightly sautéd or sautéd until they are brown and crispy. Other ingredients are sautéd next. Lastly, making sure there is enough butter in the pan, the farinha de mandioca is added and mixed with all of the other ingredients. The butter is used to add moisture to the dry flour. The trick is to get just the right amount of butter so as not to make the farinha de mandioca too moist or too dry!

As with all Brazilian dishes everyone has their own recipe for farofa and swears by it. This is my favorite recipe and the one that I make the most. For a different farofa recipe take a look at this one from fellow blogger Sally.

Receita de FarofaIngredients

3/4 cup farinha de mandioca
2 – 4 tbsp butter
1/2 onion, thinly sliced
2 slices of bacon, finely chopped
1 handful of Cheiro verde or parsley

Melt the butter in a frying pan over medium heat. Add the onions and sauté until they are just beginning to brown. Add the bacon and fry for 3 – 4 minutes. Add the cheiro verde together with the farinha de mandioca. Keep over the heat for approximately 1 minute. Remove from the heat and place into a serving bowl. This can be served warm, cold, or room temperature.

Eat with meat (sausage is my favorite), rice, and beans.

For a PDF of this recipe CLICK HERE!

Comments: To make this recipe it is absolutely essential that you use farinha de mandioca. The fine tapioca flour that is used to make pão de queijo will not work. Finding the course manioc flour outside of Brazil is not all that easy. I have found it in the international section of some supermarkets in the USA, but not frequently. You can easily buy it online. Take a look here for links of where to buy it or this link will take you directly to the product! You have the option of buying ‘torrada’ or ‘cruda/crua’. The ‘torrada’ has a stronger more nutty flavor than the ‘cruda/crua’. My favorite brand for farinha de mandioca is Yoki!