Fried Manioc Balls

Fried Manioc BallsBecause I have a lot of manioc or cassava in the house I am trying to be as creative as possible in my cooking. Manioc is not something that I am used to cooking and, honestly, there are very few recipes I know that use it. So, at the moment, I am constantly pulling out my recipe books to look for new and different recipes that use manioc. A few weeks ago I made fluffy manioc rolls which turned out beautiful and will definitely become a staple recipe. Then sometime later I tried to make these fried manioc balls, which turned out amazing! So far I am managing to successfully use manioc in my cooking:)!

Frying foods is big in Brazil and although I love fried foods I actually rarely fry anything at home. I prefer not to fry foods in the house as I detest the after smell of oil, so as a general rule, I stay away from any kind of frying. But, when I came across this recipe I figured that I had to give it a go. My husband loves fried rice balls and for the past weeks he had been asking me to make them. Instead, I gave this recipe a try! They are comparable to the fried rice balls, just a little bit heavier!

The recipe itself is super easy. The most work is actually boiling the manioc which takes about half an hour. You need to make sure it is REALLY well cooked as you are going to mash them up. The rest of the ingredients include, chopped onion, parsley, grated cheese, salt, pepper, egg and flour. Mix everything together, heat the oil, and fry away.

These are best eaten fresh, but you can save them for the next day, they will just lose their crunch.

Happy frying!

Fried Manioc BallsFRIED MANIOC BALLS

2 cups of cooked and mashed manioc
1 tbsp of finely chopped onion
2 tbsps of chopped parsley
3-4 tbsps of grated cheese
2 eggs
1 tsp of salt
Pepper to taste
6-10 heaping tablespoons of white flour
1 cup of vegetable oil

Boil the manioc for 30 to 45 minutes until well cooked. Remove the inner stalk and mash. Set aside to cool.

Mix the onion, parsley, cheese, salt and pepper. Add the mashed manioc and mix well. Add the eggs and mix until fully incorporated. Add the flour and mix well. If you would like a firmer ball you can add more flour.

Heat the oil in a pan on the stove. Once the oil is hot, using two tablespoons, spoon the mixture into the oil and fry until brown. Turn over to fry the other side. Remove from the oil and let rest on a paper towel. Continue in this manner until all the batter has been fried.

Eat as a snack with a nice cold beer or as an accompaniment to dinner.

Fluffy Brazilian Manioc Rolls

Fluffy Brazilian Manioc RollsI first made manioc bread about three years ago. My neighbor gave me some manioc and I decided to have a go at making bread with it. It turned out really nice. It was super fluffy and really tasty. But, after that one time, I never made it again. Probably because manioc, in its raw form, is a vegetable that I rarely buy.

Recently, however, I have been buying organic manioc to sell along with the produce from my farm and what is leftover I end up keeping at home. So, finally, I decided to give another go at making manioc bread.

This time, instead of making a bread, I decided to go with a bit of a richer roll, similar to brioche. The recipe was really easy and fast to make. The rolls turned out delicious and fluffy and were a perfect roll to eat just with butter or with some delicious strawberry and rhubarb jam from my neighbor.

Here is the recipe. Give it a go. If you can’t find manioc at your local supermarket you can probably substitute with mashed potato.
Fluffy Brazilian Manioc Rolls

FLUFFY MANIOC ROLLS

600g/1.3lbs cooked and mashed manioc
2 tbsps of white sugar
45g bread yeast
1 cup of milk
1 cup of vegetable oil
1 tsp of salt
2 tbsps of unsalted butter
3 eggs
1kg/2.2lbs of white flour

Peel and chop the manioc. Place in a pan of water and boil until soft (if you have a pressure cooker, boil the manioc for about 30 minutes). Remove from the water and mash well with a fork. Add the milk and mix until you reach a smooth consistency (it is ok if you have some lumps).

In a mixing bowl add the sugar, yeast, oil, salt, butter and eggs. Add the manioc and milk mixture and using a kitchen aid or wooden spoon mix until well incorporated. Slowly begin adding the flour a little at a time until you have a dough that is smooth and not sticky. Knead for approximately 10 minutes.

Place in a large bowl, cover with a lid or plastic wrap and let rise until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

Preheat your oven to 250C/480F.

Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. On a lightly floured surface, shape small rolls, approximately 20. Place on the prepared baking sheets and set aside to rise for 15-20 minutes, until doubled in size.

Brush the tops of the rolls with egg. Bake for 20 minutes until golden brown.
Fluffy Brazilian Manioc Rolls

Feijoada – Brazilian Black Bean and Meat Stew

Brazilian FeijoadaThe other week, I was scrolling through all of the posts that I have done on my blog and was surprised to see that I hadn’t done a post on feijoada. I’m still a little bit in shock that I haven’t posted it here yet, but, let’s get over that shock and dig into this absolutely amazing dish!

Feijoada or black bean stew is the national dish of Brazil and is a must-have for when you visit Brazil. It is prepared with black beans and an assortment of meats, such as salted pork, beef and any kind of pork trimmings, ears, tail and feet. Bacon, pork ribs, sausage and jerked beef are commonly included as well. The fejoada is prepared over a low heat in a thick clay pot. The beans and meat are pre-cooked, some of the meats, like the bacon and sausage may be quickly fried in the pan before adding the beans. The smells are mouth-watering and the final dish should have a healthy amount of meat with a light covering of a dark purplish-brown broth from the beans.

It took me sometime to get accustomed to this dish, but that was in large part because beans were not quite my favorite thing to eat. But, it is difficult to not like this dish and after some time I fell in love with feijoada and can’t get enough of it.

It is difficult to go wrong with feijoada. It can be made with any variety of meats, traditionally pork and beef, and you can use as many cuts of meat as you want or as little. My recommendation is to always try to have some sausage, bacon and either pork ribs or pork loin. Just those meats alone can make an absolutely delicious Saturday lunch with friends and family.

Brazilian FeijoadaFeijoada is commonly eaten with rice, collards, farofa and slices of orange to cut the heaviness of the beans and meat!

Today I will leave you with a simple feijoada recipe (you can leave out any of the meats you do not eat or do not have, and although I have put quantities, these are just indications), and for the accompaniments you can click the links below.

> Brazilian White Rice Recipe
> Sauteed Collards Recipe
> Simple Farofa Recipe or Farofa with boiled egg

COMPLETE FEIJOADA

Ingredients

1 kg black beans
100 g jerked beef
50g bacon or pork belly
70 g pigs ear or 1 pigs ear
70 g pigs tail or 1 pigs tail
70 g pigs foot or 1 pigs foot
100 g pork ribs
100 g pork loin
250 g sausage

Seasonings

2 large onions, finely chopped
1 bunch of spring onions, finely chopped
3 bay leaves
6 garlic cloves, crushed
Black pepper
Salt

36 to 24 hours before making the feijoada, put the jerked beef and any salted meats in water to remove all the salt. Every few hours change the water.

If you do not have a pressure cooker, put the black beans to soak the night before.

On the day. Cut all of the meats into rough pieces, they can be a little bit bigger than bite size, but make sure they are not too big. Pre-cook the pork loin and ribs in water. I use a pressure cooker for this!

If using a pressure cooker, put the black beans with water to cook and leave cook on pressure for 30 minutes. If not using a pressure cooker, put beans in a pan with water and cook for approximately 60 to 90 minutes or until al dente.

Using a large deep pan or a clay pot, put a little bit of oil in the pan and heat. Add the onions and sautee for a few minutes, add the garlic and sautee until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the bacon or pork belly and sautee until almost cooked. Add the sausage, jerked beef, ear, tail and foot. Sautee for approximately 5 to 10 minutes. Add the remaining meat ingredients. Add the beans, bay leaf, salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer and leave on low heat for 20 to 30 minutes or until all of the meat is well cooked. If needed, you can add some water! Lastly, add the spring onions.

Serve warm with rice, collards, farofa and slices of orange.
Brazilian Feijoada

 

Information used from:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feijoada

Farofa with Boiled Egg

FarofaI get a lot of people who are looking for farofa recipes and I get a good number of questions about farofa, so I thought it was time to post a new farofa recipe. For those of you who don’t remember what farofa is or want to see my first post about it take a look HERE.

I absolutely love farofa and eat it with almost anything. My favorite is to eat it with rice, beans and meat. Traditionally it is served at barbecues with sausage, but you often find it as an accompaniment for any variety of dishes!

Farofa is super easy to make and can be made with any ingredients. Generally I stick to a simple recipe, but on the weekends or more special occasions I elaborate:). Here is one of my elaborated farofa recipes!

Ingredients

3/4 cup farinha de mandioca
2 – 4 tbsp butter
3 – 4 cloves of garlic, crushed
2 slices of bacon, finely chopped
1 boiled egg, chopped finely
1 handful of parsley

Melt the butter in a frying pan over medium heat. Add the crushed garlic and sauté for 1 minute. Add the bacon and fry for 3 – 4 minutes. Add the parsley together with the farinha de mandioca. Keep over the heat for approximately 1 minute. Lastly, add the boiled egg. Remove from the heat and place into a serving bowl. This can be served warm, cold, or room temperature.
Farofa

 

Revisiting Manioc (yuca or cassava) Flours

Many of you will remember that a while back I did a post on what tapioca flour is (take a look HERE if you haven’t read this post yet) and tried to go into some detail about the different types of manioc flours that you can find in Brazil. I thought it was time to revisit these flours and to give a bit of a briefer explanation of the different types of flours and starches that you can find in Brazil.

I have found that many people get confused about the different manioc flours (myself included) and since gluten-free products are pretty popular at the moment, I thought it would be fitting to do another post on this topic. I hope that this is helpful and clears up any doubts people have!

What is Manioc, Cassava or Yuca?

imagesDepending on where you are from you may call this root manioc, yuca or cassava. Here in Brazil it is known either as mandioca or aipim, for simplicity’s sake I will use manioc here. Manioc is a starchy root that is native to South America, it is rich in carbohydrates, calcium and vitamin C. The manioc root is not meant to be eaten raw and in order to be consumed, must be properly cooked or processed.

To cook the manioc root, peel the brown outer skin and place in a pan of water, boil until the white flesh becomes soft. Once slightly cooled remove the woody inner center (this woody center looks like a thick piece of string).

The manioc root is the basis for the many different types of ‘mandioca flours‘ you can find in Brazil and is an important part of the Brazilian diet.

1. Farinha de Mandioca/Manioc Flour
images (1)Manioc flour, known as farinha de mandioca in Brazil, is a very coarse flour and is primarily used to make farofa, pirão, and tutu among many other dishes. There are many different types of manioc flour, all with varying degrees of coarseness. Since this flour is toasted you also find different toasts in the flour, the more toasted the more nutty the flavor. This flour is almost only used in savory dishes and, as far as I know, not at all in baking. You can buy it HERE on amazon.com.

2. Polvilho Azedo/Sour Starch
polvilho azedoThis flour is fermented and has a slightly sour taste. It is a little bit coarser than the tapioca flour (polivilho azedo). It is commonly used to make pão de queijo and when hydrated with water it is used to make tapioca pancakes. It is a great flour for savory recipes! You can buy it HERE on amazon.com.

3. Polvilho Doce/Tapioca Flour
Polvilho DoceThis is the regular tapioca flour that you can find relatively easily in the USA. This manioc starch is not fermented, is a little finer than the sour starch (polivilho azedo) and has a slightly sweeter flavor. It is commonly used in sweet recipes, but can be used in savory recipes and substituted for the sour starch (polivilho azedo). You can buy it HERE on amazon.com.

Goma de tapioca4. Goma de Tapioca/Hydrated Tapioca Flour
This is a hydrated tapioca flour used in making tapioca pancake from the north of Brazil. The hydrated starch is made by adding water to tapioca flour (or polivilho azedo or polvilho doce) and passing it through a sieve to remove the lumps. Take a look HERE to read more about the tapioca pancakes.

5. Tapioca Pearls
Tapioca Pearls
This is what everyone in the USA will know as tapioca and is used to make the traditional tapioca pudding, it is used in bubble tea and in Brazil it is used to make a pudding called sagú that is made with the tapioca pearls and red wine. Tapioca pearls can be found in different sizes from about 1mm to 8mm. You can purchase tapioca pearls at any supermarket. Here is a link to buy the SMALL PEARLS. And here is a link to buy the BIG PEARLS.

6. Coarse or Granulated Tapioca
Granulated Tapioca
This is a very coarse tapioca and is very irregular in size. It is used in both savory and sweet dishes and is usually soaked in milk before being cooked. I have used this a lot to make a simple cake; because the tapioca is somewhat gooey the texture of the cake is more like a hardened tapioca pudding (doesn’t sound too appetizing, but trust me, it is delicious)! You can buy it HERE on amazon.com.

Photo Credits:
http://www.products.mercola.com
http://www.kimage.com.br
http://www.cooksinfo.com
http://www.amazon.com
www.produto.mercadolivre.com.br
http://www.emporiograosdobrasil.com.br

Thanks to From Brazil to You for some great information about manioc http://www.frombraziltoyou.org/cassava-its-importance-derivatives-and-dishes/