Have you ever heard of CURAU, a Brazilian corn pudding? Neither had I.

I still have a lot to learn about Brazilian foods. There are so many ingredients that I still do not know about or know how to use and there are hundreds if not thousands of dishes that are still waiting for me to discover them. This is what I love about writing this blog and about exploring the culinary side of Brazil. There is always something new just around the corner. How exciting, right?

A little while ago I had one of those experiences when, a dish I had not heard about before fell into my lap. This recipe came from the beautiful blog of Mariana Weber O caderno de Receitas (I spend hours on her blog, reading all of the delicious recipes – for those of you who do not read/speak portuguese, I still recommend you take a look at her blog as she has some beautiful pictures of the foods that she makes).

I hope you like this recipe as much as I do!

Curau – Brazilian Corn Pudding

2 cups of milk
1 cup of corn meal
1/2 cup of white sugar
2 tbsps butter
Cinnamon powder

Mix the milk, corn meal and sugar in a medium pan. Slowly bring to the bowl, mixing continuously. Once the mixture begins to boil you will notice it begin to thicken. Let it boil for no longer than 30 – 60 seconds. Turn of the heat and add the butter. Continue stirring until the butter is fully melted.

Transfer to a large bowl or small individual bowls. Sprinkle the cinnamon on top. Serve either cold, at room temperature or hot.

Fluffy Brazilian Manioc Rolls

Fluffy Brazilian Manioc RollsI first made manioc bread about three years ago. My neighbor gave me some manioc and I decided to have a go at making bread with it. It turned out really nice. It was super fluffy and really tasty. But, after that one time, I never made it again. Probably because manioc, in its raw form, is a vegetable that I rarely buy.

Recently, however, I have been buying organic manioc to sell along with the produce from my farm and what is leftover I end up keeping at home. So, finally, I decided to give another go at making manioc bread.

This time, instead of making a bread, I decided to go with a bit of a richer roll, similar to brioche. The recipe was really easy and fast to make. The rolls turned out delicious and fluffy and were a perfect roll to eat just with butter or with some delicious strawberry and rhubarb jam from my neighbor.

Here is the recipe. Give it a go. If you can’t find manioc at your local supermarket you can probably substitute with mashed potato.
Fluffy Brazilian Manioc Rolls

FLUFFY MANIOC ROLLS

600g/1.3lbs cooked and mashed manioc
2 tbsps of white sugar
45g bread yeast
1 cup of milk
1 cup of vegetable oil
1 tsp of salt
2 tbsps of unsalted butter
3 eggs
1kg/2.2lbs of white flour

Peel and chop the manioc. Place in a pan of water and boil until soft (if you have a pressure cooker, boil the manioc for about 30 minutes). Remove from the water and mash well with a fork. Add the milk and mix until you reach a smooth consistency (it is ok if you have some lumps).

In a mixing bowl add the sugar, yeast, oil, salt, butter and eggs. Add the manioc and milk mixture and using a kitchen aid or wooden spoon mix until well incorporated. Slowly begin adding the flour a little at a time until you have a dough that is smooth and not sticky. Knead for approximately 10 minutes.

Place in a large bowl, cover with a lid or plastic wrap and let rise until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

Preheat your oven to 250C/480F.

Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. On a lightly floured surface, shape small rolls, approximately 20. Place on the prepared baking sheets and set aside to rise for 15-20 minutes, until doubled in size.

Brush the tops of the rolls with egg. Bake for 20 minutes until golden brown.
Fluffy Brazilian Manioc Rolls

Tapioca Recipes – Two ways to use ‘goma de tapioca’

Gluten-free anything seems to be all the rage at the moment and quite regularly I get questions from people curious about tapioca flours and wondering what other gluten-free tapioca recipes I have. After a long hiatus, I am ready to share a new gluten-free tapioca recipe. If you are still a little confused about what I mean by tapioca take a look at my post on tapioca/manioc flours, hopefully that will clear some things up!

In the north of Brazil there are many foods that are made with manioc flours, much more than in the south. For a very long time manioc flours were the primary flour source in the north, therefore all breads, cakes and cookies were made with manioc flours. Over the past years these recipes have begun to make their way to the south of Brazil and slowly new and different gluten-free recipes are getting known, as well as access to some different manioc flours!

One of the most popular items at the moment is a dry-white manioc starch pancake called tapioca. This pancake is eaten for breakfast or as a snack in the north of Brazil filled with butter and cheese, or jam, or any other filling you may like.

Tapioca is made with a hydrated manioc starch called ‘goma de tapioca’. It used to be almost impossible to find goma de tapioca in the south, but with the growing popularity of tapioca you can almost find it anywhere.

Making the tapioca pancake is super easy. For those of you in the USA, the hardest thing will be trying to find the goma de tapioca. If you cannot find the goma you can always use polvilho azedo and hydrate it yourself (see below for instructions).

I often eat tapioca as an afternoon snack and for breakfast I sometimes make a richer european pancake, substituting the white flour for goma de tapioca. I have included instructions for making the traditional northern tapioca and my european tapioca pancake. Enjoy!

Making Goma de Tapioca at home:
To make the hydrated tapioca starch flour you will need to start with either tapioca flour, polivilho azedo or polvilho doce. To buy online take a look at these links: tapioca flour, polivilho azedo, polvilho doce.

You will need:
> 500g tapioca flour, polivilho azedo or polvilho doce
> 200ml water

Step 1: Put the tapioca flour, polvilho azedo or polvilho doce into a bowl. Begin adding the water a little at a time, mixing well with each addition. It is important to add the water slowly so that you guarantee all of the flour is fully hydrated. Once all the water has been mixed in, let sit for 30 minutes.

Step 2: Pass the hydrated flour through a sieve to get rid of all lumps. Store in a sealed container in the fridge. The hydrated flour will keep for up to 2 weeks.

The Brazilian Tapioca Pancake: Once you have the hydrated tapioca flour sieve the flour into a hot frying pan, make sure you create a good layer and making sure to spread evenly over the pan. Leave for 30-60 seconds and then turn over (you do not want the flour to brown). Bake on the other side for another 30 seconds. Remove from pan. You can eat the tapioca pancake with any filling you wish; my favorites are jam or cheese.

Pancakes made with goma de tapioca instead of white flour

Pancakes made with goma de tapioca instead of white flour

The European Tapioca Pancake: Although I am providing a recipe for the european tapioca pancake that I make at home, you can use any pancake recipe, just substitute the white flour for goma de tapioca (hydrated tapioca flour). I have not made this with american style pancakes, so do not know if it will work.

Give these pancakes a go, they are super tasty and are a little bit chewier than regular pancakes. They make for an excellent pancake for anyone who is gluten-free or for a different pancake in the morning!

Ingredients
3 Eggs
1 1/2 cups of Goma de tapioca (hydrated tapioca flour)
A splash of milk
Pinch of salt

Mix all ingredients together until you have a slightly runny batter free of lumps. Heat a frying pan and melt a bit of butter in it to prevent the pancakes from sticking. Pour some of the batter into the hot pan, bake until brown and then turn over. Bake the second side until brown. Remove from pan. Eat while hot with you favorite pancake toppings!

Do any of you have your own goma de tapioca recipes? If so, I would love to hear them!

 

Brazilian Rice Pudding

Brazilian Rice PuddingWhile growing up I was never very fond of rice pudding. I always found it strange to eat sweet rice, for me rice was something that was savory and I never was quite able to stomach sweet rice. When I first came to Brazil in 2005 I was a little bit surprised to see how popular rice pudding was. At almost every restaurant I went to they had some form of rice pudding for desert. Me, still being a little queasy about rice pudding never gave it a try. It was only until recently that I tried it and actually enjoyed it a lot.

So, I decided to make it at home! The recipe was really nice and easy and the rice pudding turned out delicious. What I particularly liked about this recipe is that the rice pudding is made with some lemon and orange peels, so the flavor of lemon and orange come through when eating the rice pudding. The flavoring is subtle, but just perfect. Top this rice pudding with a little bit of cinnamon and you have the perfect desert!

BRAZILIAN RICE PUDDING

Ingredients
(6 servings)

Brazilian Rice Pudding2 1/2 cups of water
2 thick slices of orange peel
2 thick slices of lemon peel
1 stick of cinnamon
1 cup of white rice
1 liter of milk
2 cups of white sugar
Cinnmon powder

Wash the rice with cold water. Wash until the water runs clean. Set aside.

In a medium pan heat the water, lemon and orange peels and cinnamon stick. After the water boils for 1 minute add the washed rice, half cover the pan and cook for 15 minutes, until the rice is cooked. Lower the heat, add the milk and sugar and cook for another 30 minutes until you have a runny but shiny cream (do not leave to boil too long as the pudding will become from dense when cool). Remove from the heat. Pour into a serving bowl, sprinkle lightly with cinnamon powder and serve warm or cold. If serving cold, put in the fridge for 1 – 2 hours before serving.